*** SPOILERS *** Lok’kin: People, Ships, Vocab and Names

Lok’kin: People, Ships, Vocab and Names

Kin– all the Klans.
Silā (Silay)- governed space, Kin rules apply
Dharma – the way, Cosmic Law, the established

Sāmeru – The Sun
Sāmeru mandella, or just the Mandella – The Solar system

Lok’kin – The klan’s of the outer solar system
Klan – (e.g. Silicium, N, Liquid Team…)
Vit – (house, carousal, parish) Home Polis, the smallest unit of government.
Mez – Band (horde), group of the same age, 16 people, (4 Kataraa of 4 people each — 4 torches)
Kot – smallest unit, room, cabin.

Kataraa (dagger) Dagger Skiff, Gun-tug, smallest interplanetary Kin ship, capable of hosting a crew 1-4 usually. Minimum four torches up to 16.

Woid – Teacher
Modryb – ‘aunt’ live-in guardian to a Dámah of aspirants.
śramaṇa, shaman/strong> – somebody who despite understanding the futility of truth, wants to look deeper.
Nīuil, Nīuilklan – Klan Nebulous
Silicium – Klan Silicium
Koro’arja – Warrior Leader
Arja – leader
Sāmaṇera (Saamanyra)young monk/nunśramaṇa
Aspirant
– student
Anāmakatvam – anonymous

Durga – castle
Takṣahima – Ice City? main Nīuil settlement on Jegis.
Nīuil – Nebulous Klan – “fog, haze, mist, clouds, airspace, sky, heaven”.
Jegis, Home planet of the Nīuil – (Indo European Ice)

2121
Leimeiê – warrior
Gaos – Leimeiê’s husband and Sessrúmnir Koroarja.
Nadi – dies on habitat strike
Kophai – dies on habitat strike
Thulogan – captain of Nīuilklan Koroarja.

k̂won Mez (Hound House) – Tamura and Gaos’ Mez (2121)

Sessrúmnir – caravan transport ship
Fólkvangr – caravan transport ship
Ýdalir – caravan transport ship (not part of the visit to Khawandagar.

2185
Leimeiê – woid
Tamura – member of Ghanti Mez
Arax – member of Ghanti Mez
Irbis (male) – member of Ghanti Dámah
Rapakê (male) – member of Ghanti Dámah, wants to be a warrior
Pago – Xenobiologist, teacher on Jegis, Klan Nīuil
Roxo – member of Ghanti Dámah (Tamura’s Dámah).

Ships:
Kataraa:
Dobha – dark animal, otter cat, creature
Serval – a small wild hinting cat

Mōdormen – caravan transport ship
Kataraa: Aglool, Aipal, Anguta
Koro’arja: (Koro’woid) Êrak

Njalnir – koro’caravan
Katara: Dobha
Koro’arja: Kouzai

Heorot – Silicium asteroid and home. Several carousels embedded into the crust. M-type, iron-rich, core fragment.

Zil
Khawandagar- Zil Habitat (Kurdish name)

Hind
Hind Habitats: Vedana (sensation), Sanna (perception), Sankhara (fabrications)

Proto Indo European words:
Proto-Indo-European
Indo-European_vocabulary

 

Cache of:

http://sarmatianinthesca.blogspot.com/2011/05/list-personal-names.html

http://yarntheory.net/ursulageorges/names/iranianroots.html

Sunday, May 29, 2011
List: Personal names
When I was researching names for my persona, Ursula George’s page and her associated St. Gabriel Report 3315 were the biggest source (all but two from Zgusta’s book). Almost all of the names I’ve read are listed there, but I’ve come across a few others and wanted to include them in a list here for anyone looking. I’ve put everything in alphabetical order based on our alphabet rather than the Greek. Read the original report (or Zgusta) if you want to know what the Greek letters were.

As is said in the report, last names often indicate relation to someone else (husband or father). Males simply use the genitive form of their father’s name while females use words meaning “wife of” and “daughter of” in addition to the genitive form of their mother or husband’s name.

It’s also conceivable that if your persona spent a lot of time or was well known among another culture or tribe, they might be known locatively as “Sarmatian/of the Sarmatians” or “/of the (The former was indicated in the St. Gabriel’s report, the latter is my own assertion. EDIT: I’ve found uses of “So-and-so of the Alans/of Alania in regards to Alanian women married to Georgian kings, so it’s definitely an option for a persona in medieval Alania.).

The third naming option available to much of the SCA is a descriptive last name (job, prominent physical attribute, etc…). I haven’t found any precedent for this specifically among Sarmatians, but it’s something to think about. EDIT: I’ve found a use of “the Great” as an epithet for a medieval Alanian king, so that is an option for a medieval Alanian persona (assuming it isn’t considered presumptuous).

Most known Sarmatian names were transcribed into Greek (they didn’t have a written language of their own), so their naming convention is used. This means they probably aren’t exactly the same as what the Sarmatians themselves would have used, but it’s what’s available to us. Any not recorded in Greek (probably Latin) have an asterisk next to them. Make sure your naming convention for the last name follows the appropriate language or give it in the English form if you aren’t sure.

If a name is from a source other than Zgusta, I’ll give as much information about it as I can. If you want information on a name from that book (like when the person lived/died) and can’t get a copy of it, contact me and I’ll check it out from the library as soon as possible. I really wish I could find a copy for sale…

Along with the names themselves, I’ve listed genitive forms in order to help you with the last name. This list will be updated as I find genitive forms for all the endings. Anyone knowledgeable about Ancient Greek genitives?

Another thing I should note is the intermarriage of Georgians and Alanians in medieval Alania. I’ve included some names you can find as belonging to Alanians here- only those which cannot trace their male lineage to a source other than the Alans. I haven’t included any which are blatantly biblical as opposed to ethnic Alanian (as in Mary of Alania and David Soslan). These seem to pop up when the paternal line is traced back to a male Georgian. I also did not include David’s descendants, At’on and Jadaron of the Osi, or his father, Demetrius, because of their patrilineal origin. Although they lived among the Ossetians, but I don’t know if their names are Ossetian. The names in this paragraph are a viable option for a persona of mixed heritage, the list below is intended for someone who wants to be sure their name is Sarmatian in origin.

Greek genitives
Name endings (original ending first, genitive form second)
-a:
-as: -a
-ê:
-ês:
-is: -ios
-ôn: ônos
-os: -ou
-us:

Of the Sarmatians
Male- Saurmatês
Female- Sauromatis

Female-specific
gunê: “wife of”; precedes husband’s name
thugatêr: “daughter of”; precedes father’s name

Personal names

Female

*Ababa: Recorded by Jordanes. Possibly the Alanic mother of Maximinus Thrax (he was born 172 or 173). His Gothic heritage is disputed (Jordanes thinks the Goths and Getae are the same people and Maximinus was more likely from Thrace). I haven’t found anymore information regarding this name. I’m not sure Jordanes’ information would be considered reliable documentation for passing the name.
*Alda, Alde, Aldi: Recorded by John Skylitzes. Early 11th-century Alanian princess, wife of a Georgian king. Definitely alive from 1027-1033. Info in Alemany (2000) and Tourmanoff (1976).
Amagê: A Sarmatian Queen near the Black Sea in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus. Info in Harmatta (1970). Sulimirski records a Queen Amage of the Roxolani in 165-140 BC. I need to get a copy of Harmatta to look into this temporal disparity because he was definitely talking about the same person.
Aritê
*Borena: Alanian princess, wife of a Georgian king. Definitely alive from 1030-1072. Info in Garland (2006).
*Burdukhan: Alanian mother of Tamar of Georgia. Late 10th century, definitely alive in 1160. Info in Eastmond (1998).

Leimeiê
Mada
Maiôsara
Sarukê
Storanê
Tamura
Tirgataô: Queen of the Ixomatae in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus.

Male

Abaziôn
Abdarakos
*Abeacus: In Sulimirski. King of the Siraces in the Kuban valley and steppe north of the northwest Caucasus in 66-63 BC.
Aboagos
Abragos
Abrozeos
Adoês
Akasas, Akkas
Aldis
Alexarthos
Amaiakos,Amaeiakos
Amôspados
Andra[n]akos
Aphtheimakos,Aphthaimakos
Apsachos
Araouê[g]os
Ardagdakos
Ardaros,Ardarakos,Ardariskos
Argamênos
Argouanagos
Aroasios
Arsaliôn
Arsêouachos,Arsêoachos,Arsêochos
Arttham[ma]nos, Arthiemmanos
*Asander: From coins Husband of Dynamis. King of Bosporus from 37-17 BC.
Asanos
Asaros
Aspakos
Aspamitharês
Asphôrougos
Aspourgos, *Aspurgus: First spelling from Zgusta, second from coins. Second was King of Bosporus from 8 BC-38 AD.
*Attaces: King of the Alans in Hispania. Successor of Respendial. Died in 426 AD (Alemany, 2000) or 418 AD (Bury, 1923).
Auasis
Aubadag[-?]
Aunamos
Aurazakos
Azariôn
Azos, Aziagos
Badagos, Badakês, Padagos
Badas
Bagdochos
Bagdosauos
Bagês, Bagios
Baioraspos
Baiormaios
Banas
Bastakas
Baxagos
Bida[k]ês
Bistês
Bôrakos
Boraspos
Bôrnôn
Bôropsazos
Bradakos
Chanakês
Chardeis
Chodainos
Chôdarzos
Chodekios
Chodiakios, Chozi[a]kos
Chodios
Chôdonakos
Chopharnos
Chophrasmos, Chophrazmos
Choroathos, Choroua[thos]
Chouarsazos
Chounaros
Dadagos, Dadakos
Danarasmakos
Dandaxarthos
Didumoxarthos
*Durgolel, Dorgolel: King of medieval Alania in the 11th century. Info in Garland (2006).
Dosumoxarthos
Eisgoudios
Êlmanos
*Eochar: A king of the Alans in 446. May or may not be the same person as Goar. If he isn’t a different person, “Eochar” may be an erroneous recording of “Gochar”. Info in Alemany (2000).
Êrakas
Eubarnakos
*Eunones: From Sulimirski. King of the Aorsi in the Don-Volga region in 49 AD. Ally of the Romans and of Cotys, the new Bosporan ruler.
*Eupator: Bosporan king on coins from 155-166 AD.
Gadas
Gadikios, Gadikeios
*Galatus: In Sulimirski. King of the Roxolani in 179 BC

Gaos
Gasteis, Gastein
*Goar, Gochar: A king of the Alans in Gaul. Born before 390 and died sometie between 446 and 450. Info in Alemany (2000).
Gôdigasos
Godosauos
Gôsakos
Gosôn
Iaphagos
Iauakos
Iazad[agos], Iezdagos, Iezdrados
*Ininthimeus: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 235-240 AD.
Insazagos
Iôdas
Iôdesmagos
Iramboustos
Irauadis
Irbis
Irganos
Kainaxarthos, Kênexarthos
Kamorsazês, Kamarsazês
Karaxstos, Karaxtos, Karastos
Karsas
Karzoazos, Karzouazos
Kasagos, Kasakos
Kasais
Katokas, Kattas, Katiôn
*Khuddan: Alanian king in the 10th century. Info in Eastmond (1998).
Kopharnos
Kossas,Kosous,Kossous,Kousous,Kos[sô]n
[K]ouridatês (-os)
Kouzaios
Madakos, Madôis
Maiakos
Maipharnos
Maisês
Maniagos
Mardauos
Masas
Mastas, Mastous, Mastounos, Mastarous
Mazis, Mazous
Medosaccus: Husband of Amagê. King of Sarmatians near the Black Sea in the 4th century BC. Recorded by Polyaenus.
Megis
Mêthakos, Mêsakos
Meuakos
Mordos
Mourdagos
Nabazos
Namgênos
Namouchos
Nauakos, Nauagos
Oaroz[b]alakos
Ocho[a]rzanês
Olgasus
Omrasmakos
Orsiomichos
Ossi[gas?]os
Ouachôza[k]os, Ochôdiakos, Ochôziakos
Ouag[a]sis
Ouaras
Ouarazakos
Ouarzbalos
Ouastobalos
Ourbazos
Ourgios
Ousigasos, Ousigos
Oustanos
Ouzia[g]os
Oxardôzis
Pagos
Parspanakos
Pateiros
Pateis, Patias
Pêrakos
Phadinamos, Phazinamos
Phadious, Phazious
Phaldaranos
Phandarazos
Pharnagos, Pharnakês, Pharnakiôn
Pharnarnos
Pharnês
Pharnoxarthos
*Pharsanzes: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 253-254 AD.
Phidas,Phidanous,Phêdanakos,Pidos,Pideis,Pidanos
Phleimnagos,Phlimanakos,Leimanos,Limnakos
Phlianos
Phodakos
Phorêranos
Phorgabakos
Phoriauos
Phoros
Phosakos
Phourtas
Pitopharnakês, Pitpharnakês, Phitopar[nakês?]
Pourthaios, Pourthais, Pourthakês
Radamasis
[R]adameistos
Radamophourtos
Radamphôn
Radampsôn, Radanpsôn
Radamsadios, Radamps[adios]
Raodmêos
Rapakês
Rass[o]gos
Rathagôsos
*Respendial: A king of the Alans in Gaul. Birth and death dates unknown, but definitely alive between 406 and 409 AD. Had been succeeded by 426 AD (Alemany, 2000) or 418 AD (Bury, 1923).
*Rhadamsades: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 308-323 AD.
*Rhescuporis: From coins. Several kings of Bosporus bore this name from 68-342 AD.
Sadimanos
Saitapharnês
*Sambida: A king of the Alans in Valentia in 440. Recorded in Chronica Galla of 452.
Sanagos
*Sangiban : Jordanes records this as the name of the king of the Alani at the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains (451 AD).
Sarakos
Saratos
Saraxazos
Sasas, Sasôn
Sattiôn
Sauagaskos, Sauagas
Sauaiôsos
Sauanôn
*Sauromates: Name born by several members of the Sarmato-Thracian Bosporan dynasty, which ruled from about 33BC to the 4th century AD. Coins with busts of Sauromates I were minted sometime from 90-124 AD. Coins with Sauromates II were minted sometime from 174-211 AD.
Seauagos
Seimeikos
Sênêkas
Siauakos
Siauask[is]
Siauos
Siômachos
Siranos
Sôchoubazos
Sorchakos
Sozirsauos
Sp[a]kos
Spadakos
*Spaldines: From Sulimirski. A king of the Aorsi in 64 BC. Raised an army of 200,000 horsemen to fight in the Bosporan Kingdom’s civil war.
Sparophotos
Spharobais
Spithamês
Stormais
Stosarakos
Sturanos
Suarobais
*Synges: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 258-276 AD.
*Tasius: In Sulimirski. King of the Roxolani in 110 BC.
*Teiranes: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 275-279 AD.
*Theothorses/Thothorses: From coins. A king of Bosporus from 275-279 AD. Coins minted sometime from 279-309 AD.
Thirthagos
Thuloganos
Tibês
Tillês
Tiranês, Teiranês, Tiranios
Toumbagos, Toumibagos
Xaiorsazês
Xartamos, Xarthanos
Xêgodis
Xiamphôkanos
Xobas
Zabagios
Zabandos
Zabargos
*Zosines: In Sulimirski. King of the Siraces in 49 AD. Supported Mithradates VIII against his half-brother Cotys. To save his kingdom, he later sought peace and became a tributary of Rome.

 

proto-indo-european-dictionary

 

 

 

Male names from the Viking Age
Arne: eagle
Birger: keeper
Bjørn: bear
Bo: the resident
Erik: absolute ruler
Frode: wise and clever
Gorm: he who worships god
Halfdan: the half Danish
Harald: lord and ruler
Knud: knot
Kåre: with curly hair
Leif: descendant
Njal: giant
Roar: fame and spear
Rune: secret
Sten: stone
Skarde: with cleft chin
Sune: son
Svend: freeman who is in the service of another
Troels: Thor’s arrow
Toke: Thor and helmet
Torsten: Thor and stone
Trygve: trustworthy
Ulf: wolf
Ødger: wealth and spear
Åge: man that ploughs; ancestor

Female names from the Viking Age
Astrid: beautiful, loved
Bodil: penance and fight
Frida: peace
Gertrud: spear
Gro: to grow
Estrid: god and beautiful
Hilda: the fighter
Gudrun: god and rune
Gunhild: fight
Helga: sacred
Inga: of the god Inge
Liv: of life
Randi: shield or shrine
Signe: the one who is victorious
Sigrid: victorious horsewoman
Revna: raven
Sif: wife and bride
Tora: of the god Thor
Tove: dove
Thyra: helpful
Thurid: Thor and beautiful
Yrsa: wild or she bear
Ulfhild: wolf or battle
Åse: goddess

Halls:

BILSKIRNIR
Bilskirnir ( means ‘Lightning Crackle’) and is the hall belonging to Thor. According to the Grímnismál, Bilskirnir is the largest of buildings and contains 540 rooms.
BREIDABLIK / Breiðablik
Bridablik ( means ‘Broad gleaming’ or ‘Broad View’) and is the hall belonging to Baldur. Described in the Gylfaginning and Grímnismál as being a place where nothing unclean can dwell. It also said to “have the fewest baneful runes” and nothing evil may enter.

Eljudnir / Éljúðnir
Eljudnir (means ‘Sprayed with snow’ or ‘Damp with sleet’) and belongs to Hel located in Nifleheim. The hall is only mentioned specifically in the Gylfaginning in the Prose Edda (however Hel is mentioned in both Eddas). The hall is described as displaying a large threshold called Fallandaforad, which means ‘falling to peril’. It is filled with great mansions with high walls and tall gates. The Prose Edda describes Hel as being the one that rules over the huge mansions and her servants working in the Underworld. In Grímnismál, Hel is said to reside beneath one of the three roots growing from Yggdrasil. Hel was given the order by Odin that she should “receive, and give boarding to those sent to her, and that those will be people who die from old age and sickness.”

FENSALIR
Fensalir ( meaning ‘Fen Lands’ or ‘Sea Halls’) and is the hall belonging to Frigga. Mentioned in the Poetic Edda, specifically in the Völuspá, scholars have theorized that Fensalir may been the location of various springs and swamps or even perhaps the sea.

FOLKVANG / Fólkvangr
Fokkvang ( means ‘field of the host’ or ‘army-field’) and has also been called “the field of warriors”. It belongs to Freyja and is said to contain nine castles. Her home lies within a meadow presided over by her where half of those who die in combat go upon their death. The other half go to Odin to reside in Valhalla. In Freyja’s hall, the dead are catered to by faithful wives and women who died before marriage.
Fólkvangr is mentioned in the Poetic Edda where Freyja’s hall Sessrúmnir (‘the many seated’) stands. In the Grímnismál it states: “The ninth is Folkvang, where Freyja decrees, Who shall have seats in the hall; The half of the dead each day does she choose, And half does Othin have.” (Henry Bellows translation).

GLADSHEIM / Glaðsheimr
Gladsheim (means ‘Bright or Radiant Home’) and is a realm in Asgard that belongs to Odin’s Valhalla. Mentioned in both the Grímnismál and Gylfaginning, Gladsheim contains a meeting hall with 13 high seats where those of the high council of Asgard hold their meetings.

GLITNIR
Glitnir (means ‘Shinning Hall’) and belongs to Forseti, the Norse god of law and justice. This is where legal disputes are settled and conflicts resolved. It is also attested to having been a home to Baldr, Forseti’s father. Glitnir is described as having pillars of red gold and its’ roof being plated in silver.

HIMINBJORG / Himinbjörg
Himinbjorg (means ‘Heavens Mountain’ or ‘Heaven’s Castle’) and belongs to Heimdall. It is mentioned in the Poetic Edda where it states the Heimdallr dwells there as a watchman for the gods and it being located where the rainbow bridge Bifrost meets the heavens. In the Grímnismál it states: “Himingbjorg is the eight, and Heimdall there, O’er men hold sway, it is said; In his well-built house does the warder of heaven, The god mead gladly drink.” (Bellows translation)

Landvidi
Landvidi (meaning ‘White or Wide Land’) belongs to Vidar. The hall is said to have tall branches, fresh flowers, lush vegetation and high grasslands surrounding it. It is the picture of solitude and all that is naturally beautiful that comes from the earth. Vidar is the symbol of regrowth and sustainability and will be there to avenge Odin in the final battle.

NOATUN / Nóatún
Noatun (means ‘Ships Enclosure’) and belongs to Njord. Noatun is mentioned in the Poetic Edda as being located by the sea, and fishermen and explorers alike would ask Njord for success on their expedition and protection from the strong winds.

SOKKVABEKK / Sökkvabekkr
Sokkvabekk (means ‘Sunken Bank’, ‘Sinking Brook’, or ‘Seeress’) and belongs to Sága. It is said to be a place of cool flowing waves where Odin and Sága sit and drink. There are some scholars who propose that Sága may be the goddess Frigg and that Sökkvabekkr could be a connected source to Fensalir since both are described with the same attributes. In the Poetic Edda, the Grímnismál states: “Sökkvabekk is the fourth, where cool waves flow, And amid their murmur it stands; There daily do Othin and Saga drink, In gladness from cups of gold.” In the book Skáldskaparmál, Sága is listed as being present among a list of 27 ásynjur but no further information is provided. Jacob Grimm theorized that the drink shared among them was the drink of immortality and that Saga could be described as a wife or daughter of Odin, leading further scholars to believe that she is Frigga or perhaps a Norn / Schöpferins (shapers of destiny).

THRUDVANGR / Þrúðvangr / Thruthheim
Thrudvangar (‘Power Field’ or ‘Power Plain’) the land that belongs to Thor and his Hall Bliskirnir. Mentioned specifically by King Gylfi in the Gylfaginning, it is described as being the largest of buildings ever erected and recounts the story of Thor returning there after the völva Gróa unsuccessfully attempted to remove the stone lodged in Thor’s head after his battle with Hrungnir.

VALASKJALF / Valaskjálf
Valaskjalf (‘The Shelf of the Slain’ or ‘Hall of Silver’) is one of the halls belonging to Odin. Valaskjalf is an adorned building roofed with silver. At its’ pinnacle of Valaskjálf is Odin’s seat called Hlidskjalf from which he watches all that takes place in the Nine Worlds. Reference to it can be found in the Poetic Edda, specifically the Grímnismál. The hall is also said to be the home of Vali who is a son of Odin and is said to survive Ragnarok which may mean he will dwell in Odin’s high seat after the battle.

VIGRID / Vígríðr
(sometimes also referred to as Óskópnir which refers to the ‘not yet made’)
Vigrid (means ‘battle-surge’ or ‘place of battles’) is the plain in Asgard where the final battle will take place. It is mentioned in the Poetic Edda briefly, but the Prose Edda gives a more detailed account of the battle that will take place between the gods and forces of Surtr, as part of the events that will occur during Ragnarök. Vigrid is said to stretch 100 leagues in every direction as mentioned by Odin (disguised as Gagnradr) in the Poetic Edda poem Vafþrúðnismál.

VINGOLF / Vingólf
Vingolf (meaning ‘Wine Hall’ or ‘Friendly Door’) is the hall and sanctuary belonging to the Asynjur. This hall is specifically mentioned in three places within the Gylfaginning, in the Prose Edda: “All righteous men shall live and be with him where it is called Gimle or Vingolf, but wicked men will go to Hel and thence to Niflhel (abode of darkness), that is down in the ninth world. (Young’s translation). Another quote from the poem is: “Odin is called Allfather because he is father of all the gods. He is also called Father of the Slain, because all those that fall in battle are the sons of his adoption; for them he appoints Valhall or Vingolf, and they are called Champions.” (Brodeur’s translation) Vingolf may be a comparable term to Gimle, the paradise where the righteous go after death.

YDALIR / Ýdalir
Ydalir ( meaning ‘Yew Dales’) is the hall belonging to Ull / Ullr. Ullr was the noble archer god and around his hall grows the tall yew trees that provide the wood that is needed to form all of the bows. Described in the Poetic Edda, Odin (disguised as Grimnir) tell Agnar: “Ydalir it is called, where Ullr has himself a dwelling made. Alfheim the gods Frey gave in days of yore for a tooth-gift”. (a tooth-gift was a gift given when a small child cut their first tooth). The Eddas also speak about Ull stepping up into a position of leadership in Asgard during Odin’s absence for ten years.

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